About Tentaroo

Tentaroo is the industry leading camp and event management system designed from the ground up for Boy Scout camps. Tentaroo currently supports events and facilities and we're working on adding websites for 2014.

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Please contact us today to schedule a 15-minute free online demo of a live camp. Let us show you how we can support your camps and events.

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Easy Friendly Interface

Tentaroo is easy to navigate and use for camps, councils and units. Our goal is to understand you and your camp even better than you do, so we can provide a cohesive, intelligent solution that will just make sense for you and all of your users.

Facilities Management

Tentaroo now includes a brand new module for facility reservations! This module includes industry leading tools to find and reserve available facilities. Pricing is $2 or 2% per reservation, whichever is less.

Blue Cards

You can now print your own blue cards using Tentaroo! All you'll need is some blue paper. Tentaroo is great for tracking requirements completed and storing them for future reference.

Customer Service

Customer service is a priority at Tentaroo. Our clients gave us a 9.2/10 rating! Clients who had a previous vendor gave it a 4/10 rating on customer service.

Customer Service

"Great customer service, prompt responses to concerns and ease of working with you. Never made to feel "stupid" when asking questions that had a simple response/fix."

Payment Reports

About Payment Reports

There are three main payment reports in the Tentaroo system. The first report just exports the payments. The second report exports the payments as well as what they're currently applied to. The third report exports the payments as well as an audit log of what the payments have been applied to over time. The third report is the most complicated but also the most useful for accounting or to get a better understanding of how changes were made over time. Each of these three reports is discussed in detail in the next three sections.

All three reports can be found on the main Reports tab, under the Event & Payment Reports tab.

Just Payments

The first payment report just exports the payments. This report can be found by clicking on the main Reports tab, then on the Event & Payment Reports tab. To start, enter the start and end date for the report.

Then, click on the Export Excel button.

The following fields are exported: Date Added, Payment Date, Amount, Payment Amount, Balance, Payment Type, Receipt #, Card, eCheck Acct, eCheck Bank, eCheck Acct Name, Notes, Group Name, Group Contact Name.

When you open this file in Excel, you may need to format the first two columns. The first column will display both a date and time if formatted that way in Excel. The second column is just a date (no time information is included), so format it as just a date in Excel. Once your columns are formatted, the export will look something like this:

This report only includes payment information and basic contact information for the group that made the payment. The Amount field refers to the amount due for the items in the order which is the sum of the item amounts minus any applied credit. The Payment Amount is the amount of the payment that was made.

The credit card and eCheck columns will include more information about payments that are processed online. Also, you'll see that the last payment has a balance of $250. This refers to a balance within the associated order, meaning that some of the order items have an amount due that is greater than the amount paid. More information about balances in payments and orders can be found in the Payments & Orders section.

Payments With Applications

The second payment report exports the payments as well as what they're currently applied to. This report can be found by clicking on the main Reports tab, then on the Event & Payment Reports tab. To start, enter the start and end date for the report.

Then, click on the Export With Events button.

The following fields are exported: Date Added, Payment Date, Amount, Payment Amount, Balance, Applied Credit, Payment Type, Receipt #, Card, eCheck Acct, eCheck Bank, eCheck Acct Name, Notes, Group Name, Group Contact Name, Event Name, Event Type, Applied Amount.

When you open this file in Excel, you may need to format the first two columns. The first column will display both a date and time if formatted that way in Excel. The second column does not include time information, so format it as just a date in Excel. Once your columns are formatted, the export will look something like the the following screenshot. In this example I've hidden the payment type, receipt #, credit card, eCheck, notes and group columns so that some of the other columns will fit on the screen.

This report includes the information from the first payments report but also displays how the payment is currently applied to events, class fees, facility reservations or products. Each order item in the orders/payments with an non-zero amount is listed in this report. The Amount field refers to the amount due for the items in the order which is the sum of the item amounts minus any applied credit. The Payment Amount is the amount of the payment that was made. One payment may be included multiple times to describe all of the different items it is applied to. One example of this is the payment that is on the last three rows of this report.

Order items must still exist in order to be included in this report. For example, if one of these payments paid for a camper's individual registration, that application of funds will no longer be shown if the registration is deleted from the system. Instead, the portion that was paying for the camper's registration will be added to an Unapplied row. One example of an Unapplied row is the last row in the export. You'll see that both the Event Name and Event Type are set to Unapplied. An unapplied amount indicates that amount has been added to the group's credit pool.

Remember that unapplied funds aren't necessarily part of a group's available credit. The $5 is listed as unapplied for this order because the $5 was not used in this order. However, in this case, the last $5 of the payment went towards a facility reservation in a different order.

Let's look at another payment that is using credit. The first payment listed is for $600 but $100 of credit was applied which means this payment can pay for up to $700 worth of order items. All $700 has been applied to the trip called Our Trip on 5/2/13.

Audit Log

The third report exports the payments as well as an audit log of what the payments have been applied to over time. This report builds on the other two and is the most complicated. However, this report can also be the most useful for accounting or to get a better understanding of how changes were made over time.

The audit log report can be found by clicking on the main Reports tab, then on the Event & Payment Reports tab. To start, enter the start and end date for the report.

Then, click on the Export Audit Log button.

The following fields are exported: ID, Date Added, Payment Type, Credit?, Discount?, Order ID, Item Name, GL Account Name, GL Account #, Event, Event Type, Amount Change, Group, First Name, Last Name, Payment Added, Payment Date, Payment Type, Receipt #, Payment Amount, Card, eCheck Acct, eCheck Bank, eCheck Acct Name, Notes

When you open this file in Excel, you'll need to format the date/time columns as mentioned in the previous sections. Once your columns are formatted, the export will look something like the the following screenshot. In this example I've hidden most of the fields that we've already reviewed in the other reports.

I'll start by explaining what some of these fields represent. The first two columns are related to the audit log itself. The ID column is a unique identifier for a row that is incremented when each change is added to the audit log. It's included here to make the order of these changes clear since sometimes a change will happen on the same date and time as another. The first Date Added column here is not necessarily the date the payment was added. Instead, it's the date of the change. This could be the date the order was added if this change is a new order; however, it could also represent the date and time a change was made to a previous order. Next, the Type field will tell you the type of item that was changed. The Credit? column tells us whether or not the change is coming from or going to the credit pool. The Order ID column tells us which order this item is in.

The Item Name column gives more details about the item. If the item is a facility, this will display the facility name and reservation start date. If the item is a camper or leader registration, the item will give the name of the participant. If the item is a class registration, the class name and the participant name are displayed. If the item is a product, the product name is displayed. Each of these items might correspond to a different GL Account. The next two columns will show the associated GL Account Name and Number.

The Event field will give the name of the event if the item is related to an event. If the item is a facility, the group trip name and date is displayed. The Event Type field displays the event type if this item is related to an event. If the item is a facility, the name of the corresponding camp location is shown.

Let's look at an example. In the previous report we saw that $700 was paid towards a group's trip. Take a look at rows 7 and 8 in the audit log. Row 7 shows the $600 coming from the payment itself and row 8 shows the $100 coming from the credit pool. Both amounts were applied to one of the cabin reservations in the trip.

Viewing an audit log history can be a great way to get a better understanding of the changes that have been made in the system over time. For example, you could pull an audit starting at the date an order was added and ending at today. Then, you could filter the rows in Excel to only list only that order's ID. Then, the rows in the audit log will give the full history of item amount changes or item removals in that order.

Similarly, you could pull the audit log report for a date range that covers some changes that were made to a camper's registration. If you then filter the Item Name column to only include rows that include the camper's name within the name of the item, you'll get a listing of all changes to that camper's registration that involved a payment or refund including class fee changes and camper registration amount changes.

I'm going to make a few changes under the summer camp registration. See if you can track how the money is tracked in the following audit log.

  1. Make a payment towards the event.
  2. Reduce the registration estimate so that they event has been overpaid. The system will then automatically add a credit to the group's account.
  3. Increase the registration again.
  4. Add a payment back, coming from the credit that was made earlier.

As you can see, I'm working late into the night to finish this user manual! The payment I made of $1680 towards the event is shown on row 23. I then removed one of the campers in the registration estimate causing an immediate credit of $320 to be added to the group's account. Unfortunately, this group had a balance of $250 on file as we saw in the previous section so $250 of that credit immediately went towards the balance. This is shown in rows 25 and 26. If I wanted to, I could edit any past order to re-create the balance but balances shouldn't generally be in the orders anyway.

I then increased the registration estimates back to where they were, added a new payment to the cart and checked out. I wanted to pay for the registration in full so I added a $320 payment to the cart. The remaining $70 of credit was applied to the order so my actual payment amount was $250.

For the next example, I'll show how the audit log can be filtered to show changes over time. First, I'll generate an audit log starting on April 1st and ending on tomorrow. Then, I'll open the log in Excel and use Excel's filtering tools to only include rows that correspond to changes made by Troop 1. I'll also use the filtering tools to further limit the rows to rows where the Item Name column contains "david harris".

From this audit log you can see that David has been very indecisive about whether or not to take the Wilderness Survival class. It also looks like the camp has been unsure as to what to charge David for this class. First, the class was added on 5/30 and $10 was paid towards the class fees. The $10 in the Amount Change column indicates the amount that was actually paid, this won't specify whether or not there was a balance. Then, a minute later the class registration was removed and the $10 that was originally paid was credited to the group's account. If the amount of this change was less than $10, we would know that the class amount was changed while in this case the class was completely removed.

Next, we see that the class was added with a $20 fee, then removed again, then added with a $20 fee again. However, in this last addition of the class on rows 22 and 23, you'll see that $5 of the class fee was paid using a new payment while the other $15 came from the credit pool. A few days later, David's class fee was reduced to $10, resulting in a $10 credit. David is still signed up for the class and order #57129 shows that he has paid the full $10 fee being billed for the class. The last row of the audit log shows David signing up for a different event.

Remember that changes are only documented in the audit log if they involve money. The audit log may be used for greater visibility into changes over time but it is primarily designed for accounting.

I hope this illustrates some of the power and flexibility of the audit log payment report. Please give us a call if you'd like some help understanding how to use this report. There's a lot you can do with this but there's a learning curve to fully get up to speed with the different capabilities this report offers.